Sensing earth and environment dynamics by telecommunication fiber-optic sensors: An urban experiment in Pennsylvania USA

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Authors

Tieyuan Zhu , Junzhu Shen, Eileen R Martin

Abstract

Continuous seismic monitoring of the Earths near surface (top 100 meters), especially with improving the resolution and extent of data both in space and time, would yield more accurate insights about the effect of extreme weather events (e.g. flooding or drought) and climate change on the Earths surface and subsurface systems. However, continuous long-term seismic monitoring, especially in urban areas, remains challenging. We describe the Fiber-Optic foR Environmental SEnsEing (FORESEE) project in Pennsylvania, United States, the first continuous monitoring distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) fiber array in the Eastern US. This array is made up of nearly 5 km of pre-existing dark telecommunications fiber underneath the Pennsylvania State University Campus. A major thrust of this experiment is the study of urban geohazard and hydrological systems through near-surface seismic monitoring. Here we detail the FORESEE experiment deployment, instrument calibration, and describe multiple observations of seismic sources in the first year. We calibrate the array by comparison to earthquake data from a nearby seismometer and to active-source geophone data. We observed a wide variety of seismic signatures in our DAS recordings: natural events (earthquakes and thunderstorms) and anthropogenic events (mining blasts, vehicles, music concerts, and walking steps). Preliminary analysis of these signals suggest DAS has the capability to sense broadband vibrations and discriminate between seismic signatures of different quakes and anthropogenic sources. With the success of collecting one-year of continuous DAS recordings, we conclude that DAS along with telecommunication fiber will potentially serve the purpose of continuous near-surface seismic monitoring in populated areas.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31223/osf.io/rswb3

Subjects

Earth Sciences, Environmental Monitoring, Environmental Sciences, Geophysics and Seismology, Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Keywords

Seismology, Geophysics, DAS

Dates

Published: 2020-06-18 13:32

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License

GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) 2.1

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