A report on gender diversity and equality at Tectonic Studies Group (TSG) meetings: 2007-2019.

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Authors

Alodie Bubeck , Natalie Farrell

Abstract

The Tectonic Studies Group (TSG) is a specialist group of the Geological Society of London that was founded in 1970 as a forum for discussion of research in structural geology and tectonics. Here, we report on gender diversity and equality at the TSG annual conferences between 2007 and 2019. Gender diversity was analysed in the following categories: 1.) talks presented; 2.) posters presented; 3.) session chairs (invited); 4.) keynote speakers (invited); 5.) TSG prize winners and judges; and 6.) organizing committees.

From 2007-2019 we observe an increase in the proportion of women presenting their research at TSG meetings across the period, from 20% in the 2000s, to 34% in the late 2010s. The average proportion of women delivering talks at TSG meetings has almost doubled, from 17% in 2007 to 30% in 2019. Further, the average proportion of women presenting posters has increased from 26% in the 2000s to 40% in the late 2010s. Women, however, remain underrepresented at TSG meetings. On average, submissions from women account for 30% of submitted abstracts. Women are also consistently underrepresented as keynote presenters, session chairs, and winners of TSG prizes.

We outline a series of recommendations for future committee members, meeting and fieldtrip organizers, and the community as a whole, that aim to achieve equitable gender representation at meetings, and for other underrepresented groups at TSG meetings.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31223/osf.io/p5xf7

Subjects

Earth Sciences, Geology, Physical Sciences and Mathematics, Tectonics and Structure

Keywords

conferences, Gender diversity and equality, Geosciences, Women in science

Dates

Published: 2019-09-10 13:13

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License

CC BY Attribution 4.0 International

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