A physics-based approach of deep interseismic creep for viscoelastic strike-slip earthquake cycle models

This is a Preprint and has not been peer reviewed. The published version of this Preprint is available: https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggz426.

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Authors

Lucile Bruhat 

Abstract

Most geodetic inversions of surface deformation rates consider the depth distribution of interseismic fault slip-rate to be time invariant. However, some numerical simulations show down-dip penetration of dynamic rupture into regions with velocity-strengthening friction, with subsequent up-dip propagation of the locked-to-creeping transition. Recently, Bruhat & Segall (2017) developed a new method to characterize interseismic slip rates, that allows slip to penetrate up dip into the locked region. This simple model considered deep interseismic slip as a crack loaded at its down-dip end, and provided analytical expressions for stress drop within the crack, slip, and slip rate along the fault. This study extends this approach to strike-slip fault environments, and includes coupling of creep to viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and upper mantle. We employ this model to investigate interseismic deformation rates along the Carrizo Plain section of the San Andreas fault. This study reviews possible models, elastic and viscoelastic, for fitting horizontal surface rates. Using this updated approach, we develop a physics-based solution for deep interseismic creep which accounts for possible slow vertical propagation, and investigate how it improves the fit of the horizontal deformation rates in the Carrizo Plain region.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31223/osf.io/c4jnh

Subjects

Earth Sciences, Geophysics and Seismology, Physical Sciences and Mathematics

Keywords

creep, Dynamics and mechanics of faulting, interseismic, Seismic cycle, Viscoelastic modeling

Dates

Published: 2019-04-24 17:28

Last Updated: 2019-09-17 15:08

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License

Academic Free License (AFL) 3.0

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